SUNSET STYLE – The Precedent: Tinker Nigga, Tailor Rapper, Soldier Die, Spy-A-Snitch

SUNSET STYLE: The Next Element of Hip Hop
by Sunez

 

“Food for thought/meals essential/shrine your mind/build your temple” – “Born King NY”

-       Ka, Patriarch G, circa Nigga States Period, 2012, The Medina Mantras

 

As a writer for almost 2 decades I have seen precedents set. An array of precedents that I have failed to counter with the deftness of wordplay nor the cruelty of printed loudness.   And all these precedents are all of the same category: fuckin’ gross concessions in Hip Hop that happen slowly. The Hip Hop writer ought to take the right, earn the privilege and gotta expose them early.  Not the type of early there is in 2012, when cries for Boom Bap are well received by the aging choir.  Instead nigga, when it makes one most disagreeable like nightmares of ready wood in a world of stiff necked, rebellious, eye rolling, tooth sucking, finger snapping, hand waving, forever red, flaw noting—Word. Nobody is fucking with you but you honor the craft with an insight that goes right even when the music’s left out the pop door.

In 94 I saw Diddy tinkering a nigga and said that Biggie’s hardcore B-side and pop A-side would ruin Hip Hop. Even in the streets of Brooklyn, I hollered that “Juicy” would dry shit up.  From Smo’s corner to Beat Street’s basement I blared out that easy sampling makes for loose pockets and choked art.

 

In 96, the seams I saw woven seemed unfounded but I said Jay-Z was gonna be the pop star to cross shit over badly.  The tailoring has been exquisite ‘til this day where Hip Hop is popped as a source of pride where the hustler nigga from Marcy Projects has made it so big.  But how big? Big enough to make a counter cultural music part of the American Dream.  Jigger enough to gruesomely gentrify one’s hometown and sell caps, t-shirts, tickets and excitement via astronomical prices that mash out pockets tougher than Billy Danze.  Still lil’ fame always meant more than money, cash and hoes. The pretty hiccup is invented, copyright Sean Carter…

Ugghh!, the battle cry for zombie infantries out the snare coffin.  The pretty hiccup is taking effect and the sickness is spreading by 1998.  So I tell the popular magazines, oversized and vibing, that I wasn’t into No Limit’s soldiering too much wackness on the battlefield.  But I had been yelling too loudly during Puffy’s No Way Out already.  That back in 1997, it was easy to see that diluted hardcore and commercially mass-effemenization would boom bye bye botti man ways into this.  So limits were reached with some but gimmicks in pink that niggas Dip their Sets in now have us drowning in frank oceans.  Oceans so filled with—Pause—weakened music a falsely falsetto auto-tuner is the new Gaye of Hip Hop.

And now all the writers and journalists, bloggers and posters are just spies for the politically incorrect.  A politricks of greed where everyone you sell to gets to get in.  There the untalented propel the forums, the hardships are hardly shipped to us in vivid vindication and the babies don’t work on skill but idolize badly pilfered trill.  This was a culture of Hip Hop that reached its peak with Black and Brown men being the leaders of women and children with violent creativity, sincere ruthlessness and insightful revolution now softened constantly in the name of humane sales.  So the greatest safeguard, no biting, is now deemed as snitching on another nigga’s paper.  Or even another honky’s cream.

 

Today when Drake is accepted as a rapping singer (who can’t rap and has no singing voice) and even our DJ Premier will put him on his top albums of the year list it examples the worst of precedents.  It means there is no more real Hip Hop so space can be made for bullshit.  And the God didn’t see Starvin B or Bronze Nazareth on that 2011 list so accepting the slight “good” of wack shit left out great music. When Eminem (a once MC that deserved a record deal for his talent) signs a carbon copy of himself, Yelawolf, that sets a precedent of biting through copying. And ultimately, when I see Action Bronson I see, in the media zoo that I am in, someone embraced more vigorously because he is white with talent as opposed to just being talented, needing development. No Black or Brown MC makes it with a voice like Ghost. But Bronson, a man that many have noted is well meaning and peace (and just may be), still has a cadence, pitch, inflection and patterned dexterity that is too similar to Ghostface Killah.

So who is the one that is supposed to tell him that if the only distinction between him and Ghost is that he is more limited in content (just weed, food and hoes) then he is not needed in Hip Hop? But he is white so now he really is supposedly needed. Who is the one to note that the great MC, like Sadat X, whose voice is crucial to their legacy, is impaired by this, all against Hip Hop principles?  Who is the one to even talk about them ol’ principles?!  This ain’t for the MCs to verse, the DJs to cut or the graffers to paint. It’s for the Hip Hop writer to build on his square with for a better understanding.

Precedents been set.  It’s now Tinker Nigga, Tailor Rapper, Soldier Die, Spy-A-Snitch and this writer knows that meals are on the wax and the wrong survive and thrive in these parts with the most dishonorable maneuvers.  This isn’t just rhyming in the park no more.  It’s niggas, bitches, wiggers and devils all getting paper in this shit, preserving that, not Art, at all costs.  But the God never took a check he didn’t write his own history for.  So I’m gon write these little books that love this Original culture in an Original style.  A Sunset Style…

 

Peace,

Sunez

 

 

 

Sunset Style:

The Next Element of Hip Hop

By Sunez

 Overview:

This book will be the first overt and uncontested display of the newly proposed element in Hip Hop culture, for official consideration, The Writer.  The basic 4 elements of Hip Hop culture, DJing, MCing, Graffiti and B-boying (Breaking) eventually gave rise to the journalistic efforts by the immediate inner city audiences of color that began to question, explain and analyze this phenomenon.  As Hip Hop journalism became the most powerful and popular force of music coverage, the writer immersed in the culture, became more than an impartial reporter.

The framework of the book is a cleverly constructed autobiography of Hip Hop writer, Sunez (aka Sunez Allah aka Edward Sunez Rodriguez), detailing his career in the journalistic industry from his beginnings as the author of the Sunset Style column.  “Rodriguez was for several years a regular contributor to the CUNY Baruch College newspaper, The Ticker. His often controversial column, Sunset Style, is a “hip hop editorial” named after Rodriguez’ working class and heavily Puerto Rican Sunset Park neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York.”- Raquel Rivera, New York Ricans From the Hip Hop Zone; Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.  From that column it continues through his career spanning stints as a freelance writer, online editor and editor at numerous publications including Vibe, XXL and The Source then to his self published street and online journals, Our SWords and Lavoe Revolt (www.lavoerevolt.blogspot.com).  Sunez reveals the evolution of his reality as the Next Element by his life experience that segue into displays of the journalistic skill, refined musical commentary and creative works that make the Hip Hop writer.  Essentially, the Hip Hop Writer is a Hip Hop element as a chronicler of the music and culture as well as a newly recognized creative force of the culture.

Sunset Style is the start of a revolution of recognition for the great Hip Hop writers who have contributed to the music and culture as journalists, music analysts, critics and as creative writers.  It is the defining testament of a 18 year Hip Hop writing career that makes Sunez the Next Element of Hip Hop: The Writer.

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Comments
Lawrence says:

Mind BLOWING Cover ..

and by the lookz of it well shall be a very promising read

Peace Sunez ..