RAPSODY – SHE GOT GAME Mixtape Review

By SUNEZ

Anyone offering us the service of music, or saturated selling sounds, must often be liked.  This will let us see them deeper or make them more swallowable pop. Hip Hop music is an expression of  unified expressions cultured together by our people.  So like is attached to real and real is bound by the principles of this Hip Hop culture.  And a mixtape is often a prelude of a new and/or updated sound to come or a refresher of their mastery.  So She Got Game is another original material collectible we put into our catalogs of one of the most deeply liked rhyming today, Rapsody.

Rapsody, an MC that beautifully exemplifies the beauty of the Black woman without barring her curves or versing her breasts but by still rhyming her ass off.  After her wonderfully intimate debut The Idea of Beautiful, she revealed a developing command in making complete songs unified in an arching theme.  With this mixtape She Got Game, she offers 16 original songs that reveal her technical skills, songwriting abilities and beat selection are still at an incredible level.

The uniqueness of each MC is their gift and the blessing is the beat.  With Rapsody, she makes songs that only females can make, making them great.  On 9th Wonder’s clever flip of Lauryn Hill’s “Ex-Factor” Rapsody builds on her place in being a B-girl lyricist, catapulting off the spark of her elder Hill yet sharing her special story (“My mama try and say my name and always mess it up/But it’s alright I’d just rather be Marlanna to her/I’m from a small country city where they dream hard/In 91 when Eric died it left us all scarred/I had a dream I met Lauryn Hill we had a heart to heart/She told me how to play the industry and keep my heart/9th Wonder already told me though/I know it’s possible he already showed me, so/Finally, the sky stopped crying/Can’t say same tho brothers still lying/Just today Observed the news and I ain’t like what I saw/When youngins try and blame another one for they flaws/My sister feel some way about my income/And how long it’s taking me to really get some”).  From 9th Wonder continuing to guide the deep beat thudding and the sharp vocal looping and chopping her entire powerful career, Khrysis adds on “Love Me in a Special Way” rocking Debarge with a bottomed out bass drum and smashed snare.  Rapsody talks about her work on inflection but it is a skill of practice that can only propel a charismatic intent.  When Rapsody verses, “My story start on the 21st of the winter/And it’s cold, I been bearing my soul just like a pin up/In the summer when it’s hot we be rolling wit out the tint up..” she uses that special off kilter inflection that no one really has to accentuate her strength.

 Rapsody is an MC of ever practiced talent in many nuances.  How her punctuation asserts her exceptional wordplay of dominance bombing up Kendrick Lamar with subliminal perfection on “Caught Up” (“I’ve been advised to kill they vibe/I ain’t seen a size/Could fill my shoes, the path I walk hella wide and skewed/I think cool is being you, if you cool it’s cool/I’m just a shark in a pool outgrowing all the rules they used to use to keep us in line/Like color class in school/The fastest food is the faster to sleeps, cousin/My garden like Eden, I eat in produced by dozens/Patches wit Patrick spit peppers to pack palaces…”). Then there is the way her inflections are punctuated without compromising the rolling flow on “Thank You Very Much” that is a triumph in breath control.   Then she has the intricate wordplay, internal rhyming and cliffhangers that bind punchlines to the next on “Never Know” (Checking on my Twitter feed, I throw a couple seeds in/Hope you fucking feast food for your thoughts, boss/A dime a dozen/The naked truth like dimes on a King cover/Demarcus Cousin, I couldn’t cover unkindess/Feeling a couple comments they come with, I’m your highness/Respect that where your chest at lioness?/ They blank it out/Then remember when you banking out/Testing me like Apollo, ain’t no clowns in house/You see this tiger crouched ’bout to pounce on ’em/Plan B’s for the morning after/In mourning, for those that gave in too early and living dormant/I’m feeling like the doorman/they all open for me/I walk right through, the view of 100 stories/In despair I rise like Ware/No matter the breaks, stairs I’m climbing ’em Ferris/Wheels, unlike stationary, we move on/Forget what you’ll never know/ just know I’m the Don/Dada that got you bothered, Korea and Obama/I’m the threat to your persona of being ill…”)

As a mixtape, she has features the best MCs would never give away on a free work from Raekwon and Common to the DJ Premier produced track.  The other features are an interesting case study of today’s rappers/hopeful MCs.   From the wiggering Mac Miller to the lost Roc Nation lyricist Jay Electronica (“The Vatican preaches Jesus then they creep up with the swine/And enslave the people of God and have them sweep up at the shrine/Up up and away, fetch a hater a therapist/Garnish the colosseum with rose petals and chariots/Candy man, candy man, spit another parable…” – “Jedi Code”).  But then Chance the Rapper’s flow on “Lonely Thoughts” fails as it binds the line between smooth spoken word and Hitler’s pause in cursive.  Still Wale, another too poppy new age MC, rhymes with fire as a driving cadence and tough punctuation on his declarations on “Dark Knights.”  As a mixtape, the many features are still a better place for them and more often than not complement her properly.

With She Got Game, Rapsody continues to amass a catalog her legendary elders must be honored by and gives us music more necessary than desired the more brilliantly she rhymes and intimately sincere she shares.