J-LOVE & WHYZ RULER – HE EXISTS Review

By SUNEZ

They say slavery ended but I still meet brothers from another mother by the drum beats. A-alike minds detect wisdom they versed with a rulership that offers direction. It’s deeper than one pop direction with wild styles harried in oppression yet filled with the many little things our people make midnight memories with. Off the prestigious government scholarship to college, the post-graduate work since Allah School in Mecca infinite masters degrees, have often been the studies of the man conquered to master of ceremonies.  Whyz Ruler is one of those brothers I’m honored to meet in these artful wars between poverty and perfection. With one of the most sustaining forces in this music, J-Love, giving him break dialects to send his punctuation through, Whyz Ruler debuts with his He Exists LP, one of the most purposeful pieces of lyricist content this great year.

Part of J-Love’s 5 LP flood, He Exists is prototype Boom Bap filled with aggressively intricate bars that cause so many to dismiss as dated.  However, Hip Hop, at its best, is listening music and Whyz’ verses are to be dissected letting J-Love’s breaks cause their proper obsession.  Throughout He Exists, Whyz uses every track to introduce a subtly gifted battle wordplay and dynamic-often inspirational, never didactic subject matter.  Instead through matter that minds itself on building out of hell, he has mined his words in varying intensity levels, real talk builds and battle bars.  

Whyz Ruler is an MC that rhymes with ladders of thought, words for others.  He doesn’t pledge his love for Hip Hop traditionally but in a way that injects idealism to what this music can be.  The East New York, Brooklyn MC, with Third World roots introduces himself on “Sold Not Told” as a gritty force of tested insight to then fortify his central thematic presence with the title track eliminating the wasteful search for a mysterious higher power.  By his actions and victory over struggles revealing actuality that he himself, is the wise ruler over his own destiny.  Now Whyz’ major thematic vision is completed when his gifts utilize his major weapon for redirection of listeners’ perceptions to greater possibilities, Hip Hop.  So now the God Whyz Ruler’s lyrical complexity gets richer and his concepts more profound when we reach his purpose.   On “Sorry,” he details the demise, “For letting Hip Hop go astray and speaking about their problems of the world today…Bringing nothing back/ more rebirth of real Art work/true representation of our placement where we stood where we stand and where we stepping to born kings and queens now bound by our surroundings…gaining knowledge spreading it amongst their peers/they fear that fact/so they took the reigns and drove us off track…break free from creative slavery one step at a time/each one brings you closer to goals.”

Now then, J-Love, an adrenaline rushing, mid-upper mid tempo MC specialist, concentrates on beatmaking through 24 tracks. All short clipped songs, the breaks are like a great Hard Bop Jazz vinyl-full deep listens reveal what can’t be heard immediately. J-Love tracks stay in a bassdrum/snare/high hat format that is Boom Bap classic familiar but along Whyz Ruler his decisions and arrangements live with Whyz’ many ideas, build out of poverty theme and righteous efforts in unholy ciphers. This Whyz Ruler & J-Love duo blend exceptionally with an extended LP with no filler.  J-Love is a master of Boom Bap’s driving cadence as “We Works It Out” has a steady bass drum Boom boom bap that snares with a cymbal crash and fluttering flutes and reverberating horns.  Piano chords from dark to light with crunchy high hats propel “Misled” while piano keys and short tambourine’d smacks on “Climbing” signature the track giving it a contemplative aura.  J-Love’s subtle workings are everywhere as the said bassdrums on “Street Heat” pound with a raspy crash upon their boom.  That small add on lets Mercifall, AG Da Coroner and Whyz brawl bars out with amplification aside from just merely upping the tempo.

This unity of J-Love breaks and Whyz concepts let songs chunk together in fortifying the ideas.  “He Exists” couples with “Not Alone” pledging as his brother’s keeper. “They Don’t Care About Us” portraits the hypocrisy that makes concrete oppression while Masta Killa adds on to “Fools Paradise” chronicling the erred methods to averting ghetto suffering.  Whyz, a real brother from the real ghetto, has lived a life a billion dollar industry exploits to gross cliche.  So his life is sold by those who ain’t never coulda told it.  This makes music making difficult for artists Whyz.  However, when we reach tracks as “Day Dreamin,” or “Hot or Cold” his take on getting an awareness of self are refreshing because of his fluctuations in delivery speed, frenetic cadence and blunt content. 

As a debut, Whyz Ruler presents himself strongly and it is this writer’s duty to attribute even more to this work.  As an emerging beatmaker (i.e. Masta Killa’s “Iron God Chamber”) and an MC with a natural conveyance of massively mature insight amidst rugged battle prose, He Exists is the narrowest of mighty introductions.  The album plays as a powerful Medina warrior score from its introduction yet there is even more Whyz has the potential to wax to us.  As we know He Exists then we know Whyz Ruler can now experiment with even more high explosives.  That is some of the science I knowledge in the drums.