DA VILLINS – BROKEN EGGZ Mixtape Review

By SUNEZ

These oddly united states may be the first in these six thousand years of hell to package the music of its slaves so well.  Through all the transitions from chained product to roaming sub-citizen, people can enjoy the wonder and wit of niggas of all types, sounds and sayings.  And here is that Hip Hop shit for this era.  Though it quickly is becoming the popped music to tell the slave what and how they ought to, it still has Nat Turners and other rebellious creators rapping.   So while there are pieces of men scattered like broken eggz that don’t measure up to any peace, da villins are cherished.  Out in the most concentrated core of the most talented and populated MC universe known, Brownsville, Brooklyn, the great Sean Price shares Rim and P of Da Villins, through the wheeled guidance of PF Cuttin, with us.

Classically, the mixtape’s entire way is turned by PF Cuttin here.  Listeners respect Sean P and he introduces and instructs (“Say dumb shit. Say your name.  Say more wild shit.  Say your name.  Say more wild shit. Say the Group. Say more shit.  Say the label. P! Fuck outta here.”) his duo of Rim and P through PF Cuttin’s superior skills and track selection.  PF’s cuts are sharp, keeps the tracks short and all choices that range time (i.e. Premier’s 1999 “So Ghetto” for Jay-Z or Salaam Remi’s 2012 “Black Bond” for NaS) and hardcore style (i.e. the choppy hard breaks of Sean P’s “One, Two” for “Dat Girl” or the tambourine snared, horn stressed “Never Let You Down Remix” for “Held Myself Down”).  He blends tracks together at the right moment, cuts back the best opening bars, without corrupting momentum, highlighting the MCs.

Rhyming off other MC’s tracks is supposed to reveal that an upcoming MC has comparable technique.  If there ever was a debut mixtape that can become the dictionary definition of it, it’s Broken Eggz.  Whether the rushing water drive on “Chronicles” or grooving through “William Round Tree,” starting off, “Lyrics like a pound/ break it down/ take it whole/ got them oz/ for the low/ for you rappers with no flows…,” Rim excels on his solo ventures.  P counters just as mightily with a sting of sinister cadence on “Warning Shots” or his tempered cadence, with superior pauses on “The Grustle” (“Clairvoyant/ toying/ it’s annoying/you can’t avoid when that boy/ get to destroying…”). Together, Rim and P achieve flow interplay that honors Smif N’ Wessun diving in and out of each other’s cliffhangers and continuing off each punchline.  As a duo, their content floats fluidly out of battle prose to vignettes of the hells, hustle and hardships they strive through.

Sean Price is a master MC merging technique and charisma and bringing forth Da Villins holds that standard.  As a prelude to full album work, their skills and content diversity easily can fulfill.  They are MCs that are the abnormal wonder of United States ghettos, specifically the land of Brownsville, Brooklyn—they have exceptionally developed talent that is filled with the grime of concrete scripture.  These are the type of MCs whose talents are obvious from the first bar and only need great beat beds under them.  With Sean P and PF Cuttin guiding and cutting those roads Broken Eggz is the prototype mixtape primer.