SUNBLAZE – DIRTY RICAN LP Review

By SUNEZ

¡Cocolo con pistola! ¡Que son los calles de Gunset!

 Activated by rice and beans and horse powered by tostones, impaired by colonization and inspired by breakbeats, rich port ciphers emerge.  Determined by Black/Brown, indigenous/African ancestry as clave keepers and b-boy pose holders.  Sermoned into subhumanity by Spaniard invaders misusing Moorish blood and brain making crossover hypocrisies and the rare beautiful contradictions of revolutionaries that won’t pass with the mystery cross, pass off the independence or pass as white.  Misdemeanored daily by free frivolity, associated savagery and a stupored state of niggery, corporate snakes slither swallow profits, the pigs beat us into pens and bureaucratic beavers logjam our civilized efforts.  And the Boricuas wonder about Puerto Rico, isla del encanto Timb-stomping through Sunset Park, the concrete vista of we Dirty Ricans.  Dust swipe, needle drop, crunch, crack, snare snap, bassline fill, the Sunblaze glares the toughest, underrated and unknown ghetto of Brooklyn a proclamation LP for the decade…

 

¡Mira el cocolo con la pistola!

¡Que son los calles de Gunset!

Uno, dos se fallaron, tres juega y cuatro corren ese Boombooneo

¡Que son los calles de Gunset!

Sunblaze, after releasing at least 80 tracks officially, in prelude to his debut, has sacrificed the overt recognition of abstract lyricism or art bars to thematically present himself as the ideal hardcore Brooklyn MC.  With Thanos, of Brotherhood 603, leading the superior work on the boards, Sunblaze uses an hour to solidify himself as a Master Conductor of rugged street topics and clever concept formats.  The Dirty Rican LP isn’t a definitive statement of all he has; instead, it’s a powerful opening chapter that focuses on the standards and ethics he will rip the mic with.

This nature of LP, the proclamation Long Player, where an MC debuts his heritage (Boricua), his ghetto (Sunset Park, Brooklyn) and his aggressive and refreshing battle mentality and cultural stance, isn’t recorded today.  In this ravished era, a nigga’s reality is a niche that must be able to change for change to chime in.  But working for change out of pockets and for the people is a rarity.  With Sunblaze distinguishing himself, we have a record of artful honor that we’ll choreograph our better moves with.

The variety of broad topics is deliberate and begins with the title track declarations (“Boricuas on the set with krylons making burners…I’m feeling like Albizu Campos in his prime/ fighting for the rights of mine/but then again, it’s a crime/so I’m a get spic/with it/when I spit/killing everything/in sight/bring the fight/because it’s me winning…”).  Hip Hop is claimed dead so often but it is now even more so a counterculture countering the popular culture when it’s “rough around the edge, still in the center/so underground the sound dwell in the cellar/stab your retina, you’re blind to the planet/and this beautiful mind-scape drop where you’re standing/ unorthodox Fort Knox/move militant, hungry as fuck/got me thinking like an immigrant/American dreams/with criminal schemes/black hoody Boom Bap shit ripping your spleen/check it/these dark vibes/and these dark skies/segregate that wack shit and call it an apartheid…” (“Laugh Now, Cry Later”).  Through battle rap imagery and a precise phrasing Sunblaze drops jewels that are captured on multiple listenings.

The content of Dirty Rican’s tracks become a unified theme of warrior works wreckognized.  Tracks as “Amongst Kings,” “Sector 7” and “Battlestar Galactica” use the imagery of comic and sci-fi/fantasy to cement a self-recognition of supremacy and exclusive realness that is uplifting and epic.  The proclamation is a cornerstone of this music and Sunblaze offers a unique script to the cipher.  The core is essentially fight music and whether with the brother from neighboring Park Slope, PH on “Bars of Fury,” Queensbridge great Tragedy Khadafi on “State of Retaliation” or Wu-affiliate Timbo King on “Marauders” the angles are boxed and kicked with excellent differentiation.   Sunblaze’s loves and hells lead to strong concept songs from the anger at the dilution of Hip Hop via the internet (“FOH”), the love of the graffiti bombing (“Spray the City”), the Get U Nows (“One With My Guns”) or the repercussions of our intense love (“With Love Comes Pain”).  It all allows for the subtlety of Sunblaze’s best depth to slowly creep in the mind as the Giallo Point DJ cuts assisting on “Combat” details the strife of this hell with distinct capsules of characters for a powerful social commentary (“Daily living is a fight with self/whether the streets or a cell or even heaven and hell…”).  Then there is the jewel of “Belly of the Beast” where Sunblaze’s skill for impassioned power vocals is on display.  The decision to be real, what it really is, what that devilishment really entails is directly warred with for a classic track.

 

¡Cocolo con pistola!

¡¡¡Uselo!!!

¡Mata el jamon y dale un verso de libertad!

¡Cono!  ¡Que Arranque del Sol!

¡En los calles de Gunset!

But the beats is there!  The music is a brotherhood that a Mental Chronicler of one’s thought needs.  It is led by one of Hip Hop’s unknown young forces of diverse devastation beatmaking today–Thanos.  Thanos, along with the aid of strong singles from his brother Arewhy, Great Majesty, Giallo Point, Quique Cruz and Satrumentals makes Dirty Rican a new age Boom Bap.  Thanos, producing 11 of the 17 songs, has a diversity that allows him to make each offering easily discernible and memorable.  There is the deep brooding bassline of “Sector 7,” the bleeping keyboarding and digi basshorn of “State of Retaliation,” the high and sharp snares of “Battlestar Galactica,” the gothic wails and cymbal crashing of the epic “Amongst Kings,” or the thick breakbeat and piano riff of “Bars of Fury” that showcase Thanos’ immensely successful range.  The add ons by the other brothers can only be let in if just as ill.  So Arewhy’s classic Boom Bap drums pounding through a bolero snatched strings are rugged beauty.  There is the hypnotically pensive horns and pondering scratches of Giallo Point’s “Combat” and Great Majesty’s violent piano scraping and high hat thickness plodding “Laugh Now, Cry Later” all to addiction. 

Well now, the Dirty Rican LP is filled with the mud made of water’s creativity and the grimy dirt of hard work.  Our people of Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Puerto Rico, colonies of indigenous worldwide, oppressed states of Original people worlds over all have a new proclaimed soundtrack of rugged Hip Hop purity.  And Sunblaze officially has a long catalog that has reached its mere beginning of illness. 

¡Cocolo con pistola!

¡No hay jamon ya!

¡Nada mas son versos de libertad!

¡Cono!  ¡Que Arranque del Sol!

¡En los calles de Gunset!

 

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