TIMELESS TRUTH – DOMINICAN DINER EP Review

By SUNEZ

There was The Baina Boyz.  The Dimelo Dames. The ConYo Crew. The Mangu Men of Malicia.  The Baboso Bangers. Dique Delinquents. Los Cheddar Carajitos. Dem Diache Niggas and so many more. All failed attempts of the Triple D Epoch: The Dastardly Dominican Devastation, a takeover of mass pop proportions where groups of Black/Brown foreigners, the collateral of clever oppressions were finally exploited to platinum infinities.  But Timeless Truth stopped this future of wackiness you never knew of.  They preempted it, countered it before it manifested and deleted it all before the dumbing downloads began.  The trademark Americana planned to bloodsuck just as they did our Africanos, as always or we Boricuas being made subcitizens a century prior.  Now the Dominicanos de Quisqueya were the next indigenous original slave market in line to be worked into coon dollar soups.  Alternate universes without any Timeless Truth, the music got more fucked and menus were scorched.  But here, Timeless Truth burned crossover groups down fully, haciendo concon con lyrics dentro flows.  Dominican Diner is then a quick confirming of SuperBad Solace and OPrime39 as MCs of the purest form representing Dominican Republic, Queens, NYC and all Original brothers just by making this Hip Hop music emphatically.

And with this mere EP, Dominican Diner, Timeless Truth destroyed the competition.  As the God embedded in the cipher, do the knowledge to what and how I saw it all…

TT vs. The ConYo Crew & The Mangu Men of Malicia

The root of it all is the lyrics and the mic techniques merging and no one wants that shit.  They tell us so with the shit they sell us that does sell.  And The Mangu Men of Malicia had the baddest thoughts to crossover, a bunch of sons of swine that were ready to mash their way into the rapero markets.  Their lyrics were all gangsta pontification on the dominance of Dominican MCs over everyone from the Cubanos Anónimo Consejo to Boricua BIG PUN.  Their lead single, “Clap Un Chin (A Lil’)” was an awkward salute to the late devil dictator Rafael Trujillo they proclaimed the Kool Herc of Dominican music.  Surprisingly, three of the five band members were actually Haitian.  In a lyric contest lost to TT they admitted they were fans of Wyclef and that Haitians do not eat people…maybe MCs.

Lyrically, Oprime and Solace focus so heavily on capturing the nature of Hip Hop principles in the music on Dominican Diner, the EP can merge into any ’92 playlist.  They place themselves properly as young professionals at the higher echelons of the craft.  Their portraits of integrity are intense in battle form (“Crème De La Crème,” “Power Pieces”) or in caper mode (“T.I.R.O.”).  Oprime’s work highlights are his end verse on “Bail Money in the Mattress” as an ill visual to his thoughts on fatherhood changing one’s mentality, the layered ode to his first to be born on “Glory,” the rugged profile on “Trife” and the simile barrage on his first verse on “Power Pieces.”  Solace’s peaks include his bio wordplay on “Glory” (“Latin kids with fantastic adjectives/and narratives/but the real challenge is/how we balance this”), the word visuals with a walking sentiment on “Crème De La Crème,” and a masterfully anthemic verse on “T.I.R.O.”  Lyrically, it sets a tone for an incredible LP to come as a perfect display of their themes and skills at the moment.  Through this, one can hear TT has the potential to express ideas and themes that can go even further behind the scenes of their battle prowess, hustle drive and MC tech displays.  They can express a Dominican perspective missing including personal insights that are becoming more profound.  With such a natural ease in expressing they have no limits.

And still the skills are a core of the Truth.  One that ConYo Crew never could master.  In the early days, they were exiled from Gunset Park in Brooklyn, right on 44 street and 5th avenue was it?  Just where Cibao Video was, a movie rental store with carpet so thick the members of the ConYo Crew thought they could sneak out from being bombed.  Instead they were exiled for rhyming they were “beecho bandits for life.”  They copped pleas saying they said, “we beat yo bands, it’s life.”  “Dique!” They were so filled with distortions that marred records to stardom from bars with mismatched syllable counts or just ain’t rhyme.  Of course they suffered repeated bouts of lacking breath control.  Filled with false ego, they would have delusions of victory as they would catch a breath back on failed bars yelling, “Coñaso!”

Still, they lost to TT when OPrime revealed textbook syllable rhyming you pay to watch on “Crème de la crème” (“Reputation of a man worth a hundred grand/in a scuffle never ran the cap-i-tan/what they call me in the motherland/and since an undergrad/hit the label that you under that…”) while Solace uses the most subtle of pauses on “Out of the Loop” to emphasize each lined statement.  The synergy is there through their ability to punctuate and emphasize their lines into chants within verses and then splash into live choruses.  Their clarity and pacing has no flaws.  Even in the context of the many mighty Queens MCs of this era from Starvin B, Gee Dubbs and Shaz Illyork to Meyhem Lauren and Nutso, the flows and interplay Oprime and Solace have are still extra ordinary.

TT vs. Cheddar Carajitos & Dique Delinquents

Listen to the crescendo verse Solace smoothly glides on in “Bail Money in the Mattress” til the snare smacks with the loudest of echos gathering us in.  The depth of Hip Hop dexterity in many forms of word choices, lyric complexity in arrangement and vocal clarity are all there.  All there in our tales as old as oppression.  An MC is a combination of incredible technique and content outlined by sincere realness.  And sometimes you can’t hear it until you see its contrast…

Los Cheddar Carajitos used to see Solace and Prime out in Corona on their many spy hunts.  They prided themselves on having more gear than the Timeless LO heads and they were right.  The problem was it was all USPA with Mountain Gear footwear and vintage Jox for sporty nights.  Now, clothes are clothes when a man can put his ideas and essence into them.  The poor man with a rich mind wears worn clothes like a King while the greatest of garments are just despair’s drapings for a fake one.  So Los Carajitos had to run away the minute they tried to have others run it.  They were never heard from again.  And you know about the Dique Delinquents.  They were sold by Rick Ross’s foreign language affiliate label, Maldito Tiguere Records.  They were a rival duo by the monikers of Bataso Balaguer and Tato Sicote.  Solace and OPrime never had much to worry about with them.  Once Tato Sictoe laced Ross’ meal with an enhanced sancocho (in the attempt to wow Ross as TT did by just rocking the vintage Snow Beach Polo jackets) that caused another seizure for the fake MC/mogul.  They were subsequently kicked off the label.  Still, it’s said that the Dique Delinquents were just French Montana’s brother and Drake’s sister following their siblings.  That is still speculation up for debate.

As I’ve built, Oprime and Solace have the potential to go beyond just the expected realness of battle supremacy and be leaders of thought as Cormega, Tragedy Khadafi, Pharoahe Monch or Nas.  Representing the great Queens diversity of Black and Brown from the glorious Dominican people, repping ill their Ralph Lauren wears as true LO heads and being in tune with their rugged urban situations, there is nothing TT cannot say on wax artfully.  Now then, we just excitingly listen to what they will say…sin el dique

Fafu Vs. The Baina Boyz aka Dem Diache Niggas

MCs as Oprime and Solace can take on any track.  This is a problem for producers.  They will probably be the only cause for any TT song to not be right.  The beatmaking for such MCs can range from challenges of experimentation to just perfectly matching their sentiments.  For Fafu, he rests in the latter in high degree.  Fafu gives b-boy live music with a variety of drum sounds, EQs, tempos and musical hooks and loops that drive the MCs and lace the ear.

His startup intro techniques for the MCs are strong as on “Trife” where an organ hits cryptic clear notes and Solace dives in with “peep the alliance predicted by the mayans/its them Queens Giants…” on strong breakbeat drums with an ill cymbal crash snare coming in and out.  Then the oooh’d vocals and the bassline power in with Oprime’s hype chants on Solace’s verse.  A song like this is so overlooked as just a good Hip Hop song but the precision in execution is real craft work you must appreciate.

Oprime39 & Solace

Y no es un vaina de cualquiera! The Baina Boyz were next in line to continue the horrid legacy of fallacy that is Pitbull.  They were about to become royalty in Miami, the graveyard where great Latin music goes to return to the essence.  Pitbull equated their vaina-inspired tracks with the carefree pseudo-quality his entire career rocked.  He was about to lead a renaissance with the delusion that his move-your-ass, joo-knowooo-joo-juan-eeet-mami bars were the revolution.  Like Pitbull, The Baina Boyz believed Tony Montana in that in Fidel’s Cuba, ‘they tell you what to do.’  So unlike Fidel’s Cuba, a deep education for the tasks one endeavored wasn’t explored.  When they made beats, the tutorial was Hustle and Flow’s “Whoop That Trick” scene.  All they did was hit keys with a silly savagery and Pitbull had more hits, Miami women bought more concrete and spring breakers enjoyed more bliss.  Until Timeless Truth made a down south stop and performed “Glory.”  The Baina Boyz learned the depth of Latin kids and the strings and progressions Fafu injected on the addictive high hat taps and rolling drums made them think differently about this Hip Hop music.  In front of the Estefans, Pitbull and a faded Flo Rida, they both exclaimed “Diache!!!” and refused to DJ Pitbull’s set if he wouldn’t rap off RZA’s “Triumph” instrumental.  Pitbull wouldn’t do it claiming copyright infringement but the truth was the bassline was rupturing the gusanos in his head from excessive swine dining.  The Baina Boyz, now known as Dem Diache Niggas, never made music again but they did visit Cuba and learned how history will absolve Fidel.

Fafu’s abilities are official on every Diner selection.  The echoing snare on “Bail Money..,” the soaring musical notes clothed over the classic breakbeat on “T.I.R.O.,” the motivating use of Aretha Franklin’s “Rock Steady” vocals with a siren holding the back and marching drums out front let TT make an anthem out of “Out of the Loop” while the sinister bass drums overlapped with deep bassline keys on “Power Pieces” really fill the cipher that TT releasse their verses through.  And the great use-of-tempo gem is the slowed down xylaphone’d “Crème de la Crème” where TT show even more skills and vocal styles on.

 

TT vs. The Baboso Bangers & The Dimelo Dames

If we think this Art is about what you sell by telling you can say anything.  Then the MCing goes live and you lose.  Like the Baboso Bangers.  They made decent headway by studying the greats and contemporaries and cleverly devising a too derivative image for themselves.  When it came time to perform, their punched in verses after nearly every three words, lack of enunciation and misunderstanding of the content they had bitten made for one confusing show.  It was only during a Timeless Truth show where the babble the Baboso Bangers blathered was exposed and the clearest audio of the set was the crowd boos.

Timeless Truth’s Dominican Diner is another set of songs that will make for great live fare.  They are the most synergistic performance duo today because they do more than just trade verses.  They work with each other, match tempos, dive in and out of multiple vocal pitches and chant and hype each other’s bars.  The mics that didn’t work for others somehow work great for them.  The basslines other MCs couldn’t rhyme through seem to be open spaces for words to them.  And there are never any gimmicks…

Pero ven dimelo…Inspired by Las Chicas Del Can and Nicki Minaj, The Dimelo Dames decided to fill their buttocks with city street construction fluids, sounds of staple dance tracks, stages with overbearing lights and costumes of little fabric and much glitz.  They were a hit until that one Lo Hip Hop event where they wore no Ralph Lauren gear but rode into SOBs in NYC on horses.  Quite the spectacle, they were allowed in and it went downhill from there.  The lights in SOBs just were not as intense and expensive as they were used to.  Some of them saw the audience now and became nervous letting allergies set in.  As the most allergy ridden one blew her nose, chunks, prepared by the finest Los Angeles surgeons, began to peel away back to her original African beauty.  The sweat on another Dame started to wash away her whitening cream and merged with her lipstick and makeup garnishes a river a river of Neapolitan ice cream flowed.  The Dame with the greatest asset tripped on a mic chord (they always lip synched and mics were merely ice cream cones to simulate and stimulate head games) falling on her prized buttocks.  Unfortunately, the concrete in there (not the stage as that’s just good wood right?!) bent out of shape and she looked like she was fused with a tambora.  Even the most hardcore MCs gasped in horror and the majority of men left with a greater appreciation for their Black and Brown women’s natural beauty (and MC skills if they had).

Timeless Truth is a duo that literally makes no mistakes live or in the studio.  For that there is so much more to expect in future progress from this strong EP, Dominican Diner. Choosing another great up and coming beatmaker in Fafu, they further Hip Hop music, solidify Queens as the strongest borough for MCing today and continue to represent mis-represented Dominicans with great honor.  The full depth of TT is still yet to be heard.  For now, we salute their destruction of so many wack groups and preventing exploitation of Dominicans in Art. Paz y Buen Provecho tambien.

Twitter handle: @timelesstruth