RAEKWON – THE WILD LP Review

By SUNEZ #SkillastratorLO #PowerWrite

…What makes rain, hail, snow—so fuck it if you don’t know already

About them passage packages that gravitate upon the planet premierely.

An invisible atmosphere I ink into sight,

a Renaissance of the real been distilled. 

Picture all the percussion posts only I can permit

With words that scribble alpha into macros

and

Scramble #RespectFAKE into lower letters,

Capital punishments for micro-aggressions.

So sound the Wire! I sling crackers.

Take devils off the planet

And now the corners are filled with the residue of violence fertilizing fulfillment.

Listen, The Wild is an exposed chaos of civilized animals

beasting on builds’ betterment

to

savage humans mating with hatred.

It gets real but the older God taught me

that if you want to see the Word

 let the letters come together.

 

The Wild is an LP that reads terrible on paper and is an abnormal surprise. Lil Wayne is still stylistic filth like the Cross Colours factory exploded into one sinister outfit—the shit dazzles some but who gon wear that shit?! G-Eazy is as product placed for white fan snares as the Royal Elite Vodka in the said video are for we niggers. Errr—There’s no need for auto correct the music but Raekwon been in a battle with RZA. A battle of a unique position, the Black men success—the stay Yang Rae or get Yin RZA. The work by RZA is still filled with the rare surprise and skill but lack the essence, the grit.  Raekwon never left the gristle but seeks to deliver—and has only done so here with weaker beatmakers. When he uses the Wu aural blueprint he makes master works as Cuban Linx 2 or Shaolin Vs. Wu-Tang. Any other way and it falls into the hands of the Dark Ages’ sinister throes. Those Dark Ages, the 2000’s when the music diluted and Swizz led the hardcore sound out of beautifully filtered thick drums and dusty samples of powerful music foregone. The crate thought was all lost for synthed sample-free compositions by tone deaf thug jingle scribblers. So whoop that trick is the Oscar of nigga scores, the soulless able em is the GOAT, the grafting rocafella wizard is King and the realness templates tumble down loosening beta drakes all over the planet. So when Raekwon cooks with today’s GMO brands there are many misses as on F.I.LA.

And on The Wild the lineup motherfuckin sucks.  It’s supposed to be GRap not G-Eazy. It’s gotta be Big Ghost not Lil’ Weezy. These beats got tons of treble often lacking the unpredictable thick grooves the RZA stencil traces. Its damn 30 years- 2017- and two songs reuse Melvin Bliss blatantly. What the Fuck?!! If Rae would only flip these tracks inside out he’d see the shit that’s not going on right inside.  Word to Popa Wu, that’s my elder Freedum Allah. Peace God.  Still, musically, The Wild is a grossly simple capable breakbeat record that will often be overlooked because Raekwon’s MCing, as RZA has noted, is greater the more overt the drum kicks. Through The Wild, Raekwon’s best decision is keeping a drum kick failsafe throughout so even when Bliss is doubled  (“This is What It Comes To” & “Visiting Hour”) the edge is always Raekwon’s lyricism and as with latter song, his songwriting insight overcomes powerfully.

Raekwon is an absolute lyrical legend running words on astro-turf til the knees of our ears sore.  The higher levels of frills are expectedly spilled (“Porsche racin’ with Scottish pitts/Best fly rum in the world/I got your girl eatin’ exotic dick/Anthrax pussy, the minks, whiskey king/Wrote my name on her face, yeah, yeah, kush me/Elevation keep the arm clustery, thousands of guns…” – “My Corner”), the veteran supremacy gives powerful worth to battle bars (“DNA is worth a fortune but I’ve still seen a life of peasants/I gave y’all style, taught you how to be fly, go ‘head and grace the sky…” – “Purple Brick Road”) while the challenge of mere wordplay is tackled brilliantly as the alliteration sprint on “M&N” reveals (“Mossberg, mind ya motion/Get molded in the morgue/Your mouth is muted, mockin’ my music/Got your wife mutilized, bank account minimized/The most malicious, ‘membered for meltin’ mics be my mission…”).  These tracks are the most commercial on paper, from bullshit guests to the grossly simplified Dark Ages 808 thump, snare pop with robotic horn and organ synth Dame Grease drops on “M&N.” Yet, it’s the powerful Chef verses that epitomize him as one of Hip Hop’s most consistently dynamic lyricists of athletic prose in the history of Hip Hop.  We may discount the musical prowess of all his solo long players but his albums are but part of the 500 plus songs he’s appeared on brilliantly. Raekwon on The Wild excels in successful experimentation that may still make a lesser song but one of supreme appreciation for his verbal, lyric and charismatic dexterity as on the RoadsArt stutter skip drivel that Shallah CP3 dribbles through.

GOAT is a term wastefully used to crown the MCs that merge the popular and able losing the entire development of a counterculture in the sold spotlight. Raekwon will often be unnamed with honorable mention because of a supposedly limited content of drug dealing and the hustling criminal underworld.  However, the depth of detail, the creativity of his word slang and its patterning of those fresh new words merged with the cleverest word choices become an all-time dynamic dialect.  In this poetic prose art of MCing it never really is about The GOAT only yet more so about the candidacy earned.  Raekwon is an absolute GOAT candidate.

But bombing the beats with no RZA or Wu elements as Bronze Nazareth, True Master or 4th Disciple who all still make supreme scores, is no easy task. What’s really the amazement of The Wild is that Rae makes songs of worth as the sultry vocals and piano keys of “Visiting Hour” are utilized for an uplifting theme, the Soul is lovely woo’d on RoadsArt’s better track, “Can’t You See” letting Raekwon reminisce in a stream of conscious snapshot of life moments.  The obvious background recreation of Gaye’s musical trademarks and simply gliding a snapped break on “Can’t You See” lets Rae tell a definitive biography of the GOAT Soul man, Marvin Gaye. The Wild isn’t a record that strips down for parts well as RZA’s greatest productions but Raekwon’s songwriting isn’t merely drug wars and triumphs. They’re compositions of battle bars in elevated word layering (“The Reign”) to non-didactic moral’d tales as “Crown of Thorns” to fight flow stances as the LP begins on “This is What It Comes Too.”

The Wu-Tang are still filled with potency and talents when there is a vigor inspired by the music.  As RZA has exposed and The Wild reveals, the brilliant complexity of the music isn’t as important as how the beats just bed an MC to awaken. The Wild is an alarm that the deepest and most prolific crew in Hip Hop history is still woke.  All that above the beats and below the verses is caused by the Son of Man, them witty unpredictable.

 
 

Sunez Allah #SkillastratorLO of the LO LIFES

#LOVEandLOYALTY A #LoLife

The organization of these principles around a counterculture, an expressive arts of creation that uplifts the ideas and thoughts of an oppressed people, is why I’m an honored builder amongst legends, knighted by heroes of Medina (Rakim Supreme Shabazz Allah/Rudy Lo, Thirstin Howl the 3rd, Bonz Malone) to further create in my element as a Hip Hop Writer of #ArtOnArt & #ScienceOnMusic. So the world may find love that locks in with the action of loyalty though they may never find another writer with my kind of grammar…

 

Representing the pillars of:

#KnowledgeOfSelf

#LoveAndLoyalty

#OriginalCreativity

Peace, Sunez

#SkillastratorLO #PowerWrite